Paid for by the Committee to Elect H. Byron Carter

WHAT IS THE COURT OF APPEALS AND

WHAT DOES A COURT OF APPEALS JUDGE DO? The Mississippi Court of Appeals first began hearing appeals in 1995 as a process to speed appeals and relieve a backlog of cases. The court of appeals has the power to determine or dispose of any appeal assigned to it by the Mississippi Supreme Court. It is limited to hearing only those cases assigned. The supreme court retains cases imposing the death penalty or involving utility rates, annexations, bond issues and election contests. By statute, the court of appeals shall issue their decision within 270 days after the final briefs have been filed. Decisions of the court of appeals are final unless at least four justices on the supreme court grant a review of the decision. If they decline to review the decision, it is final. Ten court of appeals judges are elected from five districts. The judges, however, hear cases from all over the state. The Chief Justice of the supreme court may assign one or more court of appeals judges to serve as lower court trial judges to provide docket relief as he or she deems necessary.  A Court of Appeals Judge is different from a circuit, chancery, county or justice court judge in that he or she generally does not preside over the trial of a case. A Court of Appeals Judge makes decisions after reviewing briefs, case law and sometimes listening to oral arguments of the attorneys for the parties. Therefore, experience as a trial judge is not necessary or particularly helpful for the position. Judges must be at least 30 years old, a practicing attorney and a citizen of Mississippi for at least 5 years. Byron qualifies, as he is over 30 years old, has practiced law in Mississippi and Alabama for over 32 years and was born and raised in Mississippi with all of his high school, college and law school education in Mississippi. Byron is running for court of appeals judge for the Fourth District. It is composed of the following counties and portions of counties: Adams, Amite, Copiah, Covington, Franklin, Hinds (portion), Jefferson Davis, Jones (portion), Lawrence, Lincoln, Marion, Pike, Simpson, Walthall and Wilkinson. The portion of Hinds County that is not included in the Fourth District is: Hinds County Precincts 11, 12, 13, 22, 23, 27, 28, 29, 30, 40, 41, 83, 84 and 85, and the precincts of Bolton, Brownsville, Cayuga, Chapel Hill, Cynthia, Edwards, Learned, Pine Haven, Pocahontas, St. Thomas, Tinnin, Utica 1 and Utica 2. The portion of Jones county that is not included in the Fourth District is: Jones County precincts of Northwest High School, Shady Grove, Sharon, Erata, Glade, Myrick School, Northeast High School, Rustin, Sandersville Civic Center, Tuckers, Antioch and Landrum. The date of the election is November 6, 2018.
Paid for by the Committee to Elect Byron Carter Approved by the Candidate

WHAT IS THE COURT OF APPEALS AND

WHAT DOES A COURT OF APPEALS JUDGE DO? The Mississippi Court of Appeals first began hearing appeals in 1995 as a process to speed appeals and relieve a backlog of cases. The court of appeals has the power to determine or dispose of any appeal assigned to it by the Mississippi Supreme Court. It is limited to hearing only those cases assigned. The supreme court retains cases imposing the death penalty or involving utility rates, annexations, bond issues and election contests. By statute, the court of appeals shall issue their decision within 270 days after the final briefs have been filed. Decisions of the court of appeals are final unless at least four justices on the supreme court grant a review of the decision. If they decline to review the decision, it is final. Ten court of appeals judges are elected from five districts. The judges, however, hear cases from all over the state. The Chief Justice of the supreme court may assign one or more court of appeals judges to serve as lower court trial judges to provide docket relief as he or she deems necessary.  A Court of Appeals Judge is different from a circuit, chancery, county or justice court judge in that he or she generally does not preside over the trial of a case. A Court of Appeals Judge makes decisions after reviewing briefs, case law and sometimes listening to oral arguments of the attorneys for the parties. Therefore, experience as a trial judge is not necessary or particularly helpful for the position. Judges must be at least 30 years old, a practicing attorney and a citizen of Mississippi for at least 5 years. Byron qualifies, as he is over 30 years old, has practiced law in Mississippi and Alabama for over 32 years and was born and raised in Mississippi with all of his high school, college and law school education in Mississippi. Byron is running for court of appeals judge for the Fourth District. It is composed of the following counties and portions of counties: Adams, Amite, Copiah, Covington, Franklin, Hinds (portion), Jefferson Davis, Jones (portion), Lawrence, Lincoln, Marion, Pike, Simpson, Walthall and Wilkinson. The portion of Hinds County that is not included in the Fourth District is: Hinds County Precincts 11, 12, 13, 22, 23, 27, 28, 29, 30, 40, 41, 83, 84 and 85, and the precincts of Bolton, Brownsville, Cayuga, Chapel Hill, Cynthia, Edwards, Learned, Pine Haven, Pocahontas, St. Thomas, Tinnin, Utica 1 and Utica 2. The portion of Jones county that is not included in the Fourth District is: Jones County precincts of Northwest High School, Shady Grove, Sharon, Erata, Glade, Myrick School, Northeast High School, Rustin, Sandersville Civic Center, Tuckers, Antioch and Landrum. The date of the election is November 6, 2018.
Paid for by the Committee to Elect H. Byron Carter
Paid for by the Committee to Elect Byron Carter Approved by the Candidate

WHAT IS THE COURT OF APPEALS AND

WHAT DOES A COURT OF APPEALS JUDGE DO? The Mississippi Court of Appeals first began hearing appeals in 1995 as a process to speed appeals and relieve a backlog of cases. The court of appeals has the power to determine or dispose of any appeal assigned to it by the Mississippi Supreme Court. It is limited to hearing only those cases assigned. The supreme court retains cases imposing the death penalty or involving utility rates, annexations, bond issues and election contests. By statute, the court of appeals shall issue their decision within 270 days after the final briefs have been filed. Decisions of the court of appeals are final unless at least four justices on the supreme court grant a review of the decision. If they decline to review the decision, it is final. Ten court of appeals judges are elected from five districts. The judges, however, hear cases from all over the state. The Chief Justice of the supreme court may assign one or more court of appeals judges to serve as lower court trial judges to provide docket relief as he or she deems necessary.  A Court of Appeals Judge is different from a circuit, chancery, county or justice court judge in that he or she generally does not preside over the trial of a case. A Court of Appeals Judge makes decisions after reviewing briefs, case law and sometimes listening to oral arguments of the attorneys for the parties. Therefore, experience as a trial judge is not necessary or particularly helpful for the position. Judges must be at least 30 years old, a practicing attorney and a citizen of Mississippi for at least 5 years. Byron qualifies, as he is over 30 years old, has practiced law in Mississippi and Alabama for over 32 years and was born and raised in Mississippi with all of his high school, college and law school education in Mississippi. Byron is running for court of appeals judge for the Fourth District. It is composed of the following counties and portions of counties: Adams, Amite, Copiah, Covington, Franklin, Hinds (portion), Jefferson Davis, Jones (portion), Lawrence, Lincoln, Marion, Pike, Simpson, Walthall and Wilkinson. The portion of Hinds County that is not included in the Fourth District is: Hinds County Precincts 11, 12, 13, 22, 23, 27, 28, 29, 30, 40, 41, 83, 84 and 85, and the precincts of Bolton, Brownsville, Cayuga, Chapel Hill, Cynthia, Edwards, Learned, Pine Haven, Pocahontas, St. Thomas, Tinnin, Utica 1 and Utica 2. The portion of Jones county that is not included in the Fourth District is: Jones County precincts of Northwest High School, Shady Grove, Sharon, Erata, Glade, Myrick School, Northeast High School, Rustin, Sandersville Civic Center, Tuckers, Antioch and Landrum. The date of the election is November 6, 2018.
Paid for by the Committee to Elect H. Byron Carter
Paid for by the Committee to Elect Byron Carter Approved by the Candidate